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Promotion for The Holy Winding Sheet: Exploring the Shroud of Turin

June 21, 2015 2 comments

Presumably, we will be able to see it on the EWTN YouTube Channel in the near future.

This is a quick preview of the show broadcaset early this morning and to be shown again at 2:00 PM EDT today on EWTN. The documentary features Russ Breault, Barrie Schwortz, Mark Antonacci, and Art Lind. It was filmed in St. Louis by Salt River Productions.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpeToQfGGfo


imageWhen Parker Dow, a high school senior at a Catholic school in St. Louis, began his investigation into the Shroud of Turin as part of his senior thesis, he was surprised to find out most of his friends had never heard of this cloth that virtually all experts agree wrapped the crucified body of Jesus Christ.  This hour long documentary follows Parker for six months as he meets four of the world’s leading experts to learn firsthand about the Shroud and how they have come to believe it is the burial cloth of Jesus.  This fascinating documentary traces the Shroud’s journey from Jerusalem to Turin, explores the controversial 1988 carbon testing which dated the cloth to the Middle Ages, and with real human blood detected on the cloth shows how the image of the crucified man could not have been faked.  The Holy Winding Sheet – Exploring the Shroud of Turin is a contemporary look at a mystery 2,000 years in the making

Categories: Television

Set Your DVRs

June 19, 2015 2 comments

imageThis Sunday at 3:30 AM and again at 2:00 PM, EWTN will be airing a documentary featuring Russ Breault, Barrie Schwortz, Mark Antonacci, and Art Lind. It was filmed in St. Louis by Salt River Productions.

The Holy Winding Sheet
Exploring the Shroud of Turin


imageWhen Parker Dow, a high school senior at a Catholic school in St. Louis, began his investigation into the Shroud of Turin as part of his senior thesis, he was surprised to find out most of his friends had never heard of this cloth that virtually all experts agree wrapped the crucified body of Jesus Christ.  This hour long documentary follows Parker for six months as he meets four of the world’s leading experts to learn firsthand about the Shroud and how they have come to believe it is the burial cloth of Jesus.  This fascinating documentary traces the Shroud’s journey from Jerusalem to Turin, explores the controversial 1988 carbon testing which dated the cloth to the Middle Ages, and with real human blood detected on the cloth shows how the image of the crucified man could not have been faked.  The Holy Winding Sheet – Exploring the Shroud of Turin is a contemporary look at a mystery 2,000 years in the making

The Shroud on NBC’s Today Show

June 17, 2015 15 comments
Categories: Television

Premieres Palm Sunday on National Geographic Channel

March 28, 2015 Comments off
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John Klotz Delivers the Knockout

March 20, 2015 35 comments

imageOne may find argument with historical evidence of the shroud’s existence before Lirey. But to say there is no evidence is to be …, well, in my opinion, like the nut jobs  who go about saying there is no evidence that Jesus ever existed.

John Klotz, in a MUST READ essay, CNN’s Finding Jesus loses Him, makes it abundantly clear. By page 7 John is writing:

There is more: an eyewitness account of exhibitions of a linen shroud that is more than arguably the Shroud of Turin. The witness was a French knight who participated in a siege of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade which ended with the "Christian" knights looting Constantinople and stripping it of all its cherished relics that could be carried away. Among them was the linen cloth that was the Shroud of Turin.

This is how Gibson and McKinley described it their book Finding Jesus:

"In 1203, a Flemish knight named Robert de Clari, fighting with the Fourth Crusade then camped in Constantinople, noted that a church within the city’s Blachernae Palace put on a very special exhibition every Friday. On display wasn’t just the holy image of the face of Jesus, but the actual cloth in which Christ had been buried. In 1205 de Clari composed a more detailed account: ‘There was a Church which was call[ed] My Lady Saint Mary of Blachernae, where there was the shroud (syndoines) in which Our Lord had been wrapped, which every Friday, raised itself upright so that one could see the form (figure) of Our Lord on it, and no one either Greek or French, ever knew what became of this shroud (syndoines) when the city was taken [by the Crusaders].’" 10

What happened to the Shroud after Constantinople was looted by the French? Wilson has favored the idea that it came into possession of the Order of the Knights Templar in France. The Order was suppressed in 1307 by French King Philip the Fair. On March 19, 1314, its Grandmaster, Jacques deMolay along with the Order’s Master of Normandy Geoffrey de Charny were burned at the stake.11 That Geoffrey may have been related to the Geoffrey de Charny who was the documented owner of the Shroud in 1355.

However, Gibson and McKinley echo another view that has achieved some currency. One of the French knights who participated in the sack of Constantinople was Orthon de la Roche who performed outstanding service and was named the Lord of Athens. He later returned to France. Jeanne de Vergy was a descendant of Orthon. She became the second wife of the 1355 "owner" of the Shroud Geoffrey de Charny. Gibson and McKinley hypothesize that the Shroud was a part of her dowry when she married Geoffrey12

This is not a complete recitation of the reported history of the Shroud prior to 1532. When Professor Goodacre baldy states that there is NO evidence of the Shroud’s history before Lirey, he is simply wrong.

The KO is in the next paragraph:

In my opinion that is not his most egregious error. Perhaps it’s excusable as only his opinion. However, his statement that the critics of the carbon dating were engaged in special pleading is not just wrong but, in my opinion, reprehensible.

Some of us who are not, like John, skilled lawyers, need to remind ourselves what a special pleading is – to pull out that old definition from behind mind’s cobwebs. According to Wikipedia (I’m not a scholar, either) it is “a form of fallacious argument that involves an attempt to cite something as an exception to a generally accepted rule, principle, etc. without justifying the exception.”

I share your opinion, John. It is reprehensible.

Note:  The photograph, by an unknown photographer, is of Ingemar Johansson knocking out Floyd Patterson and becoming the boxing heavyweight world champion in 1959 is a press photograph taken before 1969 and is therefore in the public domain (Wikimedia Commons)

Did Anyone Like It?

March 15, 2015 10 comments

A reader writes:

Did anyone like the CNN program on the Shroud of Turin? I got the sense from authenticists that it was too skeptical and from skeptics that is was too authenticist.

He may have a point. Compare, for instance, Barrie Schwortz on the CNN Shroud of Turin Program with Crocumentaries by Joe Nickell. (That wasn’t fair, was it?)’

Anyone else we haven’t considered? How about Antonio Lombatti (pictured); surely he has something to say? Yep: Bible Interpretation has just published an op-ed by him, The CNN Shroud of Turin. He writes:

Disappointing. This is, I believe, the most appropriate way to start my review of the recent CNN documentary on the Shroud of Turin. After 25 years of reading books, watching films and writing books and articles on this presumed relic of Christ, I am still surprised to listen to the very same popular quackery and pseudoscience passed off as rock solid scholarly researches….

[…]

However, the way CNN has cut interviews, structured short clips, advanced reconstructions of Jesus’ passion, crucifixion and resurrection, and how these were woven with some Turin Shroud images, simply strives to convey the message that the relic is the real deal. To be clearer: when the narrator talks about crucifixion, there is a short video with Jesus nailed to a cross and then the presumed marks of crucifixion on the Shroud are shown. Again, Joseph of Arimathea covers Jesus’ body with a linen cloth while we see the Turin Shroud. And this, of course, makes a deep impression on those who don’t have a precise opinion on the controversy, letting them believe it is the genuine burial shroud of Jesus.

The film begins by saying that “more than 1000 years after Jesus’ death, the cloth appeared in France”. Wouldn’t it be enough to understand that the relic is just one among the thousand forgeries of the Middle Ages? In that time, believers were not surprised to find 4 heads of John the Baptist (however, when the French monks of Amiens were told by pilgrims that they had already seen John’s head in another church, they replied they had the Baptist’s head as a child), six full bodies of Mary Magdalene and enough pieces of the True Cross to build a huge ship. The burial shrouds of Jesus number around 40. All of them were authentic, of course. The most famous shrouds were those of Aachen, Halberstadt, Hannover and Mainz (Germany), Arles, Besançon, Cadouin, Aix-en-Provence, Bayonne, Cahors, Paris, Reims, Annecy, Soissons, Carcassonne and Compiègne (France), Yohnannavank (Armenia), Constantinople, Enxobregas (Portugal), Saint John in Lateran (Rome), Einsiedeln (Switzerland).

Want more? Barrie provided a list of links at shroud.com:

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Here We Go Again

March 12, 2015 53 comments

The Rev. James Martin, a Catholic priest, calls the relationship between
James and Jesus "very complicated."

Ben Witherington III offers the Protestant view that Jesus and James
were full brothers, with Jesus being the elder.


imageMichael McKinley for CNN writes about this coming Sunday’s Finding Jesus broadcast:

In November 2002, the world was captivated by the biggest archaeological discovery ever made relating to Jesus: a 2,000 year-old ossuary — or bone box — bearing the tantalizing inscription in Aramaic: "James, son of Joseph, brother of Jesus."

If it was true, this was the first physical evidence ever found of Jesus’ existence. And yet, if this amazing ossuary was false, then it was one of the greatest forgeries in history.

Underlying the question of the authenticity of the ossuary is an even bigger theological problem: whether or not Jesus actually had any brothers. Though the debate’s origins are ancient, the answer still divides Catholics and Protestants.

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