What’s to like over on Colin’s blog right now?

Making Joe Accetta’s idea work?

imageWhat is there to like in the experimentation being live-blogged in Can that weird and wonderful Turin Shroud be modelled? See my hands-on results with dye-imprinting, reported in real time?

Well, for one thing Colin is experimenting, not simply speculating. When Luigi Garlaschelli produced his manufactured images, he was immediately criticized for failing to match many if the shroud’s image characteristics. Luigi had failed. Colin is aware of that and he is taking the image characteristics into account. It is appropriate to note, however, that all of the image characteristics are not completely unchallenged; for instance, how certain are we that there is no image beneath bloodstains? Colin is aware of those issues, as well.

He begins this way:

For background, see the posting immediately preceding this one. It attempts to explain my switch in focus from the ‘scorch’ model to that proposed last year by Joseph Accetta – based on medieval dye imprinting technology. I’ve extended and embellished it a bit, but as the title indicates, this post is about getting ‘hands-on’ experience with dye impriinting off 3D templates, with a view to getting familiar with the pros and cons of the Accetta model, vis-vis the scorch model.

imageThe posting ends this way (at least for now, there is no way of knowing when a post ends with Colin):

Oh dear. This is the reverse side, photographed straight afterwards, and already one can see bleed-through, despite the presence of that thickening agent. Late addition: the gum arabic was then left to evaporate in air until a treacly consistency, that was then painted onto the crucifix. despite the higher viscosity than used with dye, there was immediate bleed-through to the reverse-side of the linen.

Gum arabic is, sad to say,  NOT the answer if one’s attempting to achieve contact-side imprinting only. Maybe there are alternatives that need testing, but they have to fulfil a number of criteria yet to be discussed in detail.

Maybe one needs to test a starch dispersion, or colagen glue from boiling animal bones etc? Suppose it imprinted well, with minimal bleed through. Suppose it was then prone to flaking off with ageing and/or handling, leaving that fainter ghost imagewhich is what we may be seeing today. There’s still work to be done. But first I must report the results of testing out a different scenario by which a ghost image could have formed, one that results in a modification of superficial linen carbohydrates, based on the premise that alum and/or iron sulphates used as mordants could have generated sulphuric acid that at sufficiently high local concentration to react chemically to produce changes not dissimilar to those obtained by thermal means (contact scorching). For that, the experiments moved from kitchen to garage, involving as they did a degree of hazard.

RIP John Evangelist Walsh

Only this much is certain: The Shroud of Turin is either the most awesome and
instructive relic of Jesus Christ in existence-showing us in its dark simplicity how
He appeared to men-or it is one of the most ingenious, most unbelievably clever,
products of the human mind and hand on record. It is one or the other; there is
no middle ground."

— Walsh, J.E., "The Shroud," Random House: New York NY, 1963.

As reported on Saturday at Madison.com:

imageMONROE – John Evangelist Walsh died peacefully on March 19, at the age of 87, in Monroe, with his wife, Dorothy, and son, Timothy, at his bedside.

A true writer’s writer, he published more than 25 books, mostly literary biography and history, including Poe the Detective, which won an Edgar award; Into My Own: The English Years of Robert Frost; Darkling I Listen: The Last Days and Death of John Keats; Midnight Dreary: The Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe, an Edgar nominee; and The Shadows Rise: Abraham Lincoln and the Ann Rutledge Legend, finalist for the Lincoln Prize.

Though not an academic per se, through his intensive research and many publications in certain disciplines, he became part of the scholarly conversations in several fields of study, including Emily Dickinson studies, Abraham Lincoln studies, and the lives and works of Edgar Allan Poe and Robert Frost.

His mind was razor-sharp to the end; at his death he left nine complete unpublished book manuscripts, including books on Emerson, Poe, Robert Frost, the Shroud of Turin, Pearl Harbor, and two mystery novels. He was still writing the day before he died.

Read on

Details of Pope Francis’ Two Day Visit to Turin

imageMore information about the pope’s planned two day visit were announced by Turin’s Archbishop Cesare Nosiglia on March 26th. Here, the Catholic News Agency details them:

After his arrival, Francis will make his way to the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist, where he will venerate the shroud and pause for a short prayer at the tomb of Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati, another patron of the youth, who is buried in the cathedral.

In addition to the meeting with the Pope’s relatives [on the second day], other highlights of his trip include Mass, a meeting with prisoners – some of whom are immigrants or homeless, a visit with sick disabled persons.

Francis will also hold an encounter with the area’s youth, and will have lunch with some of them on the 21st, during which he will respond to questions they ask ahead of time.

The whole story from CNA: CLICK HERE

Nice Idea for the Shroud Exposition 2015

imageGoogle translation of some news reported this past Saturday on the Archdiocese’s Shroud of Turin Exposition 2015 website:

Two hundred volunteers – including doctors, nurses and other professionals – and in two local hospitals equipped to host and provide the necessary assistance to the sick and disabled who come to Turin to see the Shroud and want to stay at least one night in town.

In preparing the Exposition special attention is paid to people who are ill or disabled, which is also reflected in the way of acceptance with the creation of two Accueil , on the model of Lourdes. An initiative designed in order to allow the pilgrims (sick and carers) can, as mentioned, sleep at least one night in the city and arrange a visit to the Shroud without the fatigue of a day trip.

"These two spaces – recalled Don Marco Brunetti , Director of Health Pastoral Care, the presentation of the Accueil March 28 at Maria Adelaide in the presence of Archbishop Mgr. Nosiglia – for the entire period of the Exhibition (from April 19 to June 24), provide 70 beds with bed, breakfast, lunch, dinner, volunteers 24 hours 24 and medical care. A good example of collaboration between many realities that really puts the patient at the center.

Palm Sunday

image

Jesus entering Jerusalem, from Passion of Christ, by Hans Memling (circa 1430-1494)

Premieres Palm Sunday on National Geographic Channel

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http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/killing-jesus/

Is Bilirubin Still Accepted as an Explanation for the Red Blood?

I was just about to post a link to an interview with Barrie Schwortz by Jim Graves that appeared in yesterday’s edition of The Catholic World Report when an email from one of this blog’s readers caught my attention.

“I just read the interview with Barrie Schwortz,” the reader wrote. “I thought the bilirubin explanation for the red blood was no longer accepted by scientists.”

Some scientists, I think.

Part of one of Barrie’s answers in The Shroud: Not a Painting, Not a Scorch, Not a Photograph reads:

For 17 years I refused to accept that the Shroud was authentic. The last argument holding me back was related to the blood. The blood on the Shroud is reddish, but blood on a cloth, even after just a few hours, should turn brown or black. I had a conversation with Alan Adler, a blood chemist, on the phone and I shared my reservation. He got upset and asked, “Didn’t you read my paper?”

He had found a high content of bilirubin on the Shroud, which explains why the blood on the Shroud is red. When a man is beaten and has had no water, he can go into shock and the liver starts pumping out bilirubin. It makes the blood stay red forever. It was the last piece of the puzzle for me. I had nothing left to complain about. Sometimes I wonder why I hadn’t asked Alan Adler that question 17 years before, but I guess I wasn’t ready for the answer back then.

Although this was the final evidence that convinced me, it is no one particular piece of evidence that proves the Shroud is authentic. The entirety of evidence indicates that it is.

Ray Rogers and Anna Arnoldi, in a paper, Scientific Method Applied to the Shroud of Turin: A Review, published on Barrie’s site in 2002 argues:

The warp of ancient linen was protected with starch during weaving and the finished cloth was washed in Saponaria officinalis suds. Saponaria is hemolytic, which could explain why the old blood stains on the cloth are still red. Diane Soran (deceased) of Los Alamos, tested hemolysis on Saponaria-washed cloth before we went to Turin. The blood is still red on those 25-year-old samples. Controls are black.

And didn’t Sam Pellicori discover that fibers inside a blood soaked thread were brown while the fibers on the outside were red? If so, does this not lend credence to the idea that the blood remained red due to a hemolytic agent such as Saponaria officinalis (Soapwort) instead of bilirubin.  Small amounts of dissolved soap might have ended up on the outer surface of the threads due to evaporation concentration.  As the cloth dried, moisture wicked its way to the surface to evaporate into the air. As the water made its way to the surface it would have carried with it dissolved starch fractions and saccharides. As the water evaporated into the air these chemicals were deposited as a thin coating on the outermost fibers of the thread.

Here is a sample of some of the postings on this blog that relate:

Ten Questions for Alan Adler by Kelly Kearse

Blood Clotting and the Strange Case of Brother Hirudo

Let’s Talk Red Blood: Bilirubin, Saponaria officinalis and UV

The Orphaned Manuscript and the Color of Blood

Was Adler’s Analysis Science?

A Bold Conclusion: the Blood, the Image, the Man

How much bilirubin?

Now we are cooking with Sciencebod

If you want to fill up your weekend try this Google search: site:shroudstory.com bilirubin. You can also enter “Bilirubin” into the blog search box.

Note: The photograph is of Barrie Schwortz (CNS photo/Paul Haring). It has not been copied or directly posted here. This is an inline image that appears on The Catholic World Report.

Ray Schneider’s Five Part Eight Hour Course on the Shroud of Turin

imageRuss Breault writes:

Dr. Ray Schneider taught a five episode course on the Shroud at Bridgewater College in Virginia.  At the conference in St. Louis, I asked him to tape it and told him I would create a page on Shroud U for his course.  Well it is now complete and is an excellent addition to the site….

CLICK HERE, where we read:

This course on the Shroud of Turin will give you a comprehensive understanding of the mysteries surrounding this artifact which is widely believed to be either the actual shroud which enveloped Jesus of Nazareth in the tomb or some sort of masterful forgery intended to convey that impression. Our course will cover what is known about the shroud from a multidisciplinary perspective. Without neglecting the religious viewpoint we will examine the shroud from the viewpoint of the science that has been done, from the history that has been adduced, from forensic medical science, as well as the many speculations about faint and elusive markings. We will touch on all the attempts by both those who accept authenticity and those who seek to understand how it might have been forged. At the end of our journey you will be fully equipped to make your own informed decision.

On Russ’ site you will find video links, presentation charts (as PowerPoint and PDF files) and handouts.

Live from the Vatican YouTube Channel: Ostention of the Holy Shrowd

Noon in Rome (7:00 am EDT)

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Double-0-7’s Big 3 Analysis

Double 0 is code for license to kill. Good Shepard with a license to kill?

GoodShepard007 has posted a new video on YouTube: Finding Jesus in the Shroud. It runs about ten minutes. It is a video on matching the faces of the Shroud, the Manoppello, the Sinai Pantocrator, and a fresco of Jesus supposedly from the 1st century.  And – read on – it  is a video that makes a big deal about the number 3.

Double-0-7 tells us at YouTube:

This video shows the top 3 images in the world that match up with The Turin Shroud. After viewing the overlay images there is discussion about whether a blood stain in the shape of #3 is a random event or not. I believe the identity of the Man in the Shroud is written plainly on the right side of his forehead. The answer to the mystery of who this man is has always been right in front of our face, clearly written out. Sometimes the most obvious clue is overlooked by a forensic pathologist or detective working on an unsolved murder case or when trying to make positive ID on a victim of a wrongful death. Often the case is solved by the most obvious clue that was there from the beginning that they somehow overlooked or passed off as being coincidence. Take a look at the next 30 “Coincidences” and listen to your inner voice and trust your gut feeling, what is it telling you?

1. Jesus prayed (3) three times in the Garden of Gethsemane before His arrest.
2. Jesus was on cross for 3 hours
3. There were 3 hours of darkness while Jesus was on the cross
4. NASA confirmed there was a blood moon in Jerusalem on Friday April 3, 33AD
5. Jonah was in the belly of the whale for 3 days

[…]

And the list goes on and on over at YouTube.

And how did I miss this spy clue in the past? Galatians 3:1 tells us:

You foolish Galatians! Who put you under a spell? Was not Jesus the Messiah clearly portrayed before your very eyes as having been crucified?

Well, maybe because different versions say it differently. For instance NRSV:

You foolish Galatians! Who has bewitched you? It was before your eyes that Jesus Christ was publicly exhibited as crucified!

And, of course, context is everything.

BTW: Double 0 is code for license to kill. Good Shepard with a license to kill?

Of course, context is everything.

With a month or so to go

image. . . before the exposition starts, about one million people have signed up.  Most Saturdays and Sundays, particularly in May, are booked up — close to or at maximum capacity. There are plenty of slots available most other days of the week.

imageForty-five hundred volunteers have received training as guides and attendants. You will know them by their purple jackets.

Another Review for The Fifth Gospel

imageSam Coale, a professor of American Literature at Wheaton Colleges, in a special book review for the Providence Journal, Vatican thriller ‘The Fifth Gospel’ is a divine mystery, tells us:

If you liked Dan Brown’s "The Da Vinci Code," you will revel in this spectacularly intricate, psychologically probing, suspense churning and better written thriller-mystery by the author of "The Rule of Four." It took a decade for Ian Caldwell to write this book, and it’s all worth it with its fascinating analysis of the differences in the gospels, its focus on restoring the discredited Shroud of Turin to Christ’s actual burial cloth, its deliciously labyrinthine Vatican intrigue, its mix of cardinals, archbishops, a dying Pope John Paul II, lawyers, tribunals, priests and violent death.

This is a tale of two brothers, Simon, a tight-lipped, martyr-haunted Roman Catholic priest and diplomat, and Alex Andreou, a Greek Catholic priest whose love for his son knows no bounds, especially since his wife, Mona, left him. Ugo Nogara, an art curator, has discovered the Diatessaron, which has combined all four gospels into a single narrative, a fifth gospel, and may prove that the Shroud is real. He’s found shot dead on a stormy night at the Castel Gandolfo, after which someone breaks into Alex’s apartment.

I’ve been listening to the audio of the book, off and on, while walking the dog.  It’s good. Is a movie next? If so and if they don’t deviate too much from the novel, it will be more accurate than CNN’s piece on the shroud.

Read on: Vatican thriller ‘The Fifth Gospel’ is a divine mystery.

Do the Blue Quad Mosaics tell a different story than we think?

A reader writes:

imageDid Hugh Farey not just drop a bunker buster on the Quad Mosaics when he wrote [in a comment], “These studies are in fact largely ignored by authenticists, in that they are assumed correct and quoted as gospel without any reference to what they actually say. Non-authenticists, on the other hand, have studied them in considerable detail, such that we can say with authority that any contamination of the radiocarbon corner of the shroud made it appear older, not younger, than it really is […].”

If Rogers misread the Quad Mosaics, now what?

I think Hugh may be paradoxically right!

(link and ellipsis above added by me)

Hugh has since added the following in a  clarifying comment:

Claim: “We can say with authority than any contamination of the radiocarbon corner of the shroud made it appear older, not younger, than it really is.” This is based on John M. Morgan III’s paper ‘Digital image processing techniques demonstrating the anomalous nature of the radiocarbon dating sample area of the Shroud of Turin’ at http://www.academicjournals.org/article/article1380798975_Morgan.pdf, where he shows that the radiocarbon samples are increasingly contaminated the closer they are to the corner, and on Ray Schneider’s St Louis paper, ‘Dating The Shroud Of Turin: Weighing All The Evidence’ at http://www.shroud.com/pdfs/stlschneiderpaper.pdf, where he shows a 99.93% correlation between the radiocarbon dates and the UV-fluorescence.

I don’t know what paradoxically right means. However, Hugh is non-paradoxically right, at least as it applies to this blogger: I did assume that what I was being told about the Blue Quad Mosaics was correct. I didn’t think about it at all. Now I’m not going to make the same mistake and assume Hugh is right. I’m a layman. I’ve read the Morgan paper and I listened to Ray in St. Louis. Now I need to have it explained to me. I’m totally confused. No paradox there.

I recommend a paper by Barrie Schwortz: SOME DETAILS ABOUT THE STURP QUAD MOSAIC IMAGES

I also recommend reading both comments in their entirety ( first comment and the clarifying comment.

And I also recommend an earlier posting in this blog:  Comment Promoted: Are the Quad Mosaics Meaningless?

Tabor: A Distinctive 1st Century Weave

imageThere is no new news in James D. Tabor’s posting in the Huffington Post blog two days ago.  CNN provided the cover for repetition:

CNN focused on the question of the authenticity of the controversial "Shroud of Turin," in the first episode of its new pre-Easter series "Finding Jesus." Those challenging the authenticity of this ancient relic point to carbon dating tests done at three independent labs in 1988 that dated samples of its cloth to AD 1260-1390, which coincides with the first appearance of the shroud in France in the 1350s. Believers in the shroud’s authenticity have questioned the authenticity of the tests.

What many do not know is that we do in fact have an unquestionably authentic burial shroud from a tomb in Jerusalem that has been carbon dated to the 1st century. Any consideration of the "Shroud of Turin" should begin with a comparison of what we know rather than what we might want to believe.

The tomb of which he speaks is the tomb that Tabor and Shimon Gibson found in June of 2000.

…Textile analysis was done on the cloth–it turned out to be a mixture of linen and wool, not woven together but layered with a separate head piece. It had a distinctive 1st century weave–in contrast to the Shroud of Turin….

And then . . .

The Tomb of the Shroud continues to offer more surprises. We recently noticed that the mitDNA tests of two of the individuals in this tomb match the polymorphisms of two individuals in the Jesus family tomb–namely skeletal materials taken from both the Yeshua and the Mariamene ossuaries. What the implications of this might be, and whether there is any possible relationship between these two families, remains to be explored.

Hat tip to Joe Marino for spotting the posting.

John Klotz Delivers the Knockout

imageOne may find argument with historical evidence of the shroud’s existence before Lirey. But to say there is no evidence is to be …, well, in my opinion, like the nut jobs  who go about saying there is no evidence that Jesus ever existed.

John Klotz, in a MUST READ essay, CNN’s Finding Jesus loses Him, makes it abundantly clear. By page 7 John is writing:

There is more: an eyewitness account of exhibitions of a linen shroud that is more than arguably the Shroud of Turin. The witness was a French knight who participated in a siege of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade which ended with the "Christian" knights looting Constantinople and stripping it of all its cherished relics that could be carried away. Among them was the linen cloth that was the Shroud of Turin.

This is how Gibson and McKinley described it their book Finding Jesus:

"In 1203, a Flemish knight named Robert de Clari, fighting with the Fourth Crusade then camped in Constantinople, noted that a church within the city’s Blachernae Palace put on a very special exhibition every Friday. On display wasn’t just the holy image of the face of Jesus, but the actual cloth in which Christ had been buried. In 1205 de Clari composed a more detailed account: ‘There was a Church which was call[ed] My Lady Saint Mary of Blachernae, where there was the shroud (syndoines) in which Our Lord had been wrapped, which every Friday, raised itself upright so that one could see the form (figure) of Our Lord on it, and no one either Greek or French, ever knew what became of this shroud (syndoines) when the city was taken [by the Crusaders].’" 10

What happened to the Shroud after Constantinople was looted by the French? Wilson has favored the idea that it came into possession of the Order of the Knights Templar in France. The Order was suppressed in 1307 by French King Philip the Fair. On March 19, 1314, its Grandmaster, Jacques deMolay along with the Order’s Master of Normandy Geoffrey de Charny were burned at the stake.11 That Geoffrey may have been related to the Geoffrey de Charny who was the documented owner of the Shroud in 1355.

However, Gibson and McKinley echo another view that has achieved some currency. One of the French knights who participated in the sack of Constantinople was Orthon de la Roche who performed outstanding service and was named the Lord of Athens. He later returned to France. Jeanne de Vergy was a descendant of Orthon. She became the second wife of the 1355 "owner" of the Shroud Geoffrey de Charny. Gibson and McKinley hypothesize that the Shroud was a part of her dowry when she married Geoffrey12

This is not a complete recitation of the reported history of the Shroud prior to 1532. When Professor Goodacre baldy states that there is NO evidence of the Shroud’s history before Lirey, he is simply wrong.

The KO is in the next paragraph:

In my opinion that is not his most egregious error. Perhaps it’s excusable as only his opinion. However, his statement that the critics of the carbon dating were engaged in special pleading is not just wrong but, in my opinion, reprehensible.

Some of us who are not, like John, skilled lawyers, need to remind ourselves what a special pleading is – to pull out that old definition from behind mind’s cobwebs. According to Wikipedia (I’m not a scholar, either) it is “a form of fallacious argument that involves an attempt to cite something as an exception to a generally accepted rule, principle, etc. without justifying the exception.”

I share your opinion, John. It is reprehensible.

Note:  The photograph, by an unknown photographer, is of Ingemar Johansson knocking out Floyd Patterson and becoming the boxing heavyweight world champion in 1959 is a press photograph taken before 1969 and is therefore in the public domain (Wikimedia Commons)

Before they invented waiting in line

1931 Shroud Exposition in the rain. The folks in Turin are installing tents
over half a mile (the length of nine football fields) of a paved waiting
line space (see second picture below).

image

image

A Shift-Drift in Colin Berry’s Thinking?

To misparaphrase Dylan Thomas: Do not go gentle into that good night
but rage, rage against the dyeing of the cloth (dying of the light).


imageI remember many postings to the Shroud Science Group to and by Ray Rogers. One didn’t need to agree with him to please him. He liked new thinking if it was based on real science. At the same time, however, he was tolerant of dolts like me who did not know science very well but were willing to listen.

He liked it when people were willing to hypothesize and experiment. Propose any method for image formation that was based on real science, and you had his complete attention. I think, from what I read over the span of many months, Ray would have truly enjoyed Colin Berry’s latest blog posting, Is the Shroud of Turin image really "enigmatic"? See this straightforward, no-nonsense modelling exercise:

Colin begins with a bit of prefatory stage setting. In reacting to people who call the image enigmatic. He writes:

…  it’s perhaps not surprising that some have read “enigmatic” to mean not just "mysterious" but “supernatural”.

Personally. this retired science bod is quite happy to entertain the possibility of certain phenomena being supernatural, but only if non-supernatural explanations have been carefully considered and rigorously excluded.. Thus I’m minded to think that the "Big Bang" was the work of a supernatural entity – though that has not prevented me proposing a non-supernatural explanation (see margin notes) that uses conventional physics.

Rigorous filtering out of non-supernatural explanations is sadly not the case where the Turin Shroud is concerned -  there being little real science and a surfeit of pseudo-science aka tosh.. One has only to peruse the headlines that have appeared from scientists ("scientists"?) in recent  years.  Try googling  turin shroud to find entries like this one which as it happens was what sparked my own (renewed) interest in the Shroud, after lying dormant since the 1988/9 radiocarbon dating.

Which sets us up for a fascinating shift or drift in thinking:

What if the image layer were a faint  scorch, or, better still me(currently)thinks Joseph Accetta’s DYE imprinting (now this blogger’s preferred hypothesis in place of a previous fixation with thermal imprinting aka scorching.) 

Actually, going beyond Accetta…

Addendum: as stated here and elsewhere, this blogger now aligns himself with Joseph Accetta in  thinking that the TS image was probably dyed onto the linen, rather than heat-scorched. (I would not have rated dyeing per se very highly, but for the fact that dyeing onto linen is difficult without use of a mordant, that the most common mordant – alum – is highly acidic, and that sulphuric acid from slow alum hydrolysis may explain the faint ghost image we see today (so I’ve gone beyond Dr. Accetta  somewhat). So how does printed fabric respond to the conversions outlined above?

The posting, on Colin’s blog, started March 8th, has been growing. There is this from additional material added just yesterday:

Note: either of the two hydroxides can easily rearrange to make the hydrated oxides, like, er. McCrone’s iron oxide, accommodated within a "painted image" scenario. (Did he ever consider dyeing, as distinct from painting?).

Speaking of which – dyeing that is -  the so-called "dye-rot" that degrades some ancient printed textiles has been attributed to iron-based mordants, especially those that use iron sulphates, as distinct from iron chlorides (sulphuric acid being non-volatile, unlike hydrochloric).

Heaven help us:

Note the current focus on dyeing,  with initially soluble pigments, as distinct from painting with insoluble ones. Hat tip again to Joseph Accetta, assuming the problem of reverse-side (aka obverse-side) action can be resolved. If it can’t, this blogger may need to revert to instant thermal scorching….

Or supernatural?

Note:The image shown above is accidental. It is of a drop cloth used below a plastic grid while dyeing other pieces of cloth as discussed in Lisa Kerpoe’s blog having nothing whatsoever to do with the shroud or the topic at hand.

Barrie Schwortz: Not a Painting, Photograph, Scorch or Rubbing

clip_image001Today’s Windsor Star tells of an exhibit about the Shroud of Turin now going on in Windsor, Canada. During the course of the exhibit, Barrie Schwortz gave several lectures. Rick Dawes, in writing the news article, Replica Shroud of Turin draws thousands of curious Windsorites, quotes Barrie saying:

“I got to be in the room with this piece of cloth for five days and nights, hands on,” Schwortz said. “We are the only ones in its history to be given that (sort of) access to it.

“We were there to determine how the image was formed, we failed in that (but) we were able to determine what it was not … it was not a painting, it was a photograph, it was not a scorch, it’s not a rubbing … those are all the conventional ways.”

Divine or artistic impressions aside, few definitive conclusions can be made about the shroud’s origin but Schwortz said the discussion is timely for Catholics during the season of Lent, leading up to Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

“There are a lot of stories of what was done to Jesus (on Good Friday) but this cloth documents it with complete forensic accuracy and it bears an image that modern science still cannot explain,” Schwortz said.

Note: The above image is a thumbnail image of a photograph appearing in today’s Windsor Star

The Lone Ranger in Phoenix Later This Month

imageThe Catholic Sun, the official newspaper of the Diocese of Phoenix asks in a headline, Real or phony? Replica of Shroud of Turin on display at two parishes:

The faithful will have several upcoming opportunities to venerate a replica of the Shroud of Turin on display at two parishes in the Diocese of Phoenix and learn about the mysterious cloth.

In 1978, a team of 24 scientists examined the shroud for five days. They released a statement in 1981 that declared, “We can conclude for now that the shroud image is that of a real human form of a scourged, crucified man. It is not the product of an artist. The blood stains are composed of hemoglobin and also give a positive test for serum albumin.”

A carbon dating test performed in 1988, however, revealed fibers from the cloth dated from the around the 13th century. Those who insist in the veracity of the shroud say that the carbon dating tests were performed on a portion of the cloth that was rewoven during the Middle Ages and are therefore misleading.

clip_image001And to set the record straight, your and my favorite Lone Ranger (the paper didn’t call him that. I did):

International researcher and lecturer Russ Breault has been studying the shroud for over 25 years and founded the Shroud of Turin Education Project. Breault will present “The Shroud Encounter” at 2 p.m. March 29 at St. Steven Parish in Sun Lakes. Admission to the event is $10 with proceeds supporting the building of the parish’s new sanctuary.

While it is a fitting image, lone as in Lone Ranger doesn’t work. There is Barrie Schwortz who just this past Thursday and Friday lectured in Windsor (as we previously announced) and a host of others. But then again there were many Texas Rangers.

Did Anyone Like It?

A reader writes:

Did anyone like the CNN program on the Shroud of Turin? I got the sense from authenticists that it was too skeptical and from skeptics that is was too authenticist.

He may have a point. Compare, for instance, Barrie Schwortz on the CNN Shroud of Turin Program with Crocumentaries by Joe Nickell. (That wasn’t fair, was it?)’

Anyone else we haven’t considered? How about Antonio Lombatti (pictured); surely he has something to say? Yep: Bible Interpretation has just published an op-ed by him, The CNN Shroud of Turin. He writes:

Disappointing. This is, I believe, the most appropriate way to start my review of the recent CNN documentary on the Shroud of Turin. After 25 years of reading books, watching films and writing books and articles on this presumed relic of Christ, I am still surprised to listen to the very same popular quackery and pseudoscience passed off as rock solid scholarly researches….

[…]

However, the way CNN has cut interviews, structured short clips, advanced reconstructions of Jesus’ passion, crucifixion and resurrection, and how these were woven with some Turin Shroud images, simply strives to convey the message that the relic is the real deal. To be clearer: when the narrator talks about crucifixion, there is a short video with Jesus nailed to a cross and then the presumed marks of crucifixion on the Shroud are shown. Again, Joseph of Arimathea covers Jesus’ body with a linen cloth while we see the Turin Shroud. And this, of course, makes a deep impression on those who don’t have a precise opinion on the controversy, letting them believe it is the genuine burial shroud of Jesus.

The film begins by saying that “more than 1000 years after Jesus’ death, the cloth appeared in France”. Wouldn’t it be enough to understand that the relic is just one among the thousand forgeries of the Middle Ages? In that time, believers were not surprised to find 4 heads of John the Baptist (however, when the French monks of Amiens were told by pilgrims that they had already seen John’s head in another church, they replied they had the Baptist’s head as a child), six full bodies of Mary Magdalene and enough pieces of the True Cross to build a huge ship. The burial shrouds of Jesus number around 40. All of them were authentic, of course. The most famous shrouds were those of Aachen, Halberstadt, Hannover and Mainz (Germany), Arles, Besançon, Cadouin, Aix-en-Provence, Bayonne, Cahors, Paris, Reims, Annecy, Soissons, Carcassonne and Compiègne (France), Yohnannavank (Armenia), Constantinople, Enxobregas (Portugal), Saint John in Lateran (Rome), Einsiedeln (Switzerland).

Want more? Barrie provided a list of links at shroud.com:

The Fifth Gospel a Best Seller

imageAs of this morning, March 14, 2015, The Fifth Gospel by Ian Caldwell (Simon & Schuster) is #14 on the New York Times Best Sellers list for hardcover fiction. It has been on the list for one week. Not bad since it has only been available for one week. That is what good PR will do for you. And having been a best selling author, before, doesn’t hurt.

BTW, here, from the NYT, is about as short a description as you can get for this novel:

Two brothers, a Greek Catholic and a Roman Catholic priest, both connected to a controversial museum exhibit about the Shroud of Turin, are at the heart of a mystery set in the Vatican in 2004.

YOU MIGHT THINK, if you have been part of the shroud crowd for a few years, that the Fifth Gospel refers to the shroud. Well, it doesn’t; not in this book.  So, now, you are going to have to read it.

Rebuttal of a long-standing sindonological myth

A Guest Posting by O.K. (Read Full PDF)


Why Jesus carried the whole cross and not only the patibulum.
Rebuttal of a long-standing sindonological myth.

The long standing myth of sindonology is that Jesus carried only the horizontal arm of the cross –the patibulum. This view (which is illustrated on the picture below) is based on several premises; namely the permanent presence of vertical beam, the stipes in Roman places of public executions, and the conviction that the whole cross would have been “too heavy” to carry by the single person. Neither of those premises are correct, in fact –and if we confront them with empirical evidence from relics (the Shroud of Turin, the Tunic of Argenteuil, the Good Thief patibulum) and archeological evidence, it is clear to us that Jesus most likely carried the whole cross.

Read on

 

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