Home > Quotations > Searching Stephen Jones’ Quotation Archives

Searching Stephen Jones’ Quotation Archives

September 28, 2014

imageRecently, as with the comments about dirt being in the knee and nose area of the shroud, people were looking for quotations in books and papers.  Google books is one place to look. There are many other places to search as well. One of those places is Stephen Jones’ quotation archives.

I have found that it helps to search Stephen’s archives, with Google, using three elements:

  1. site:members.iinet.net.au/~sejones/
  2. "Shroud of Turin" (including quotation marks)
  3. Search argument (fewest possible words, generally avoid quotation marks)

Note: Putting the words “Shroud of Turin” into a Google search of Stephen’s archives is important because Stephen also collects quotations that promote creationism, etc. in the same place.

Instructions:

  1. Copy and paste:  site:members.iinet.net.au/~sejones/ "Shroud of Turin"
  2. Add a single space and your search words (e.g. nose knees dirt – don’t use quotes)

Recent versions of browsers will let you enter this in the URL entry field if you have established Google as your default search engine.

BTW:  Stephen welcomes use of these archives but asks that you give him credit. Do so, please.

image

Categories: Quotations Tags:
  1. piero
    September 29, 2014 at 10:47 am

    I tried to look and I have found the following words:
    “… found particles of aragonite with small amounts of strontium and iron …”

    under :
    members.iinet.net.au/~sejones/quotes/TSoT/stuc0811.html
    — —
    But this claim is too general and does not solve our problem …
    because the argument to develop is the following :

    Mg/Ca, Ba/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios (in aragonite)
    and
    variability of trace elements (in aragonite) …
    — —
    Then try under the following bibliographic indication:

    Allison, N.,
    Comparative determinations of trace and minor
    elements in coral aragonite by ion microprobe analysis, with
    preliminary results from Phuket, southern Thailand,
    Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 60, 3457–3470, 1996.

    or

    Jeffries, T. E., S. E. Jackson, and H. P. Longerich,
    Application of a frequency quintupled Nd: YAG source (l = 213nm) for
    laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometic
    analysis of minerals,
    J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 13, 935–940,1998.

    — —
    And I have found both the previous studies in :

    Determination of intratest variability of trace elements in
    foraminifera by laser ablation inductively coupled
    plasma-mass spectrometry
    by
    E. C. Hathorne, O. Alard, R. H. James, and N. W. Rogers

    Technical Brief
    Volume 4, Number 12
    5 December 2003

    Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union
    — — —
    link:
    http://www.gm.univ-montp2.fr/IMG/pdf/Hathorne_al_2003_G3_.pdf
    — — —
    Here a short excerpt from the abstract:

    We have developed a technique to determine the variability of trace elements (including Li, B, Na, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr and Ba) within foraminifera tests using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).
    This technique has a high spatial resolution (width 40–80 mm, depth >0.5 mm), is reproducible (<8% external reproducibility) and has low detection limits (generally <0.05 mg g1).
    We demonstrate that normalization of data to a calcite standard usually gives results that are more consistent with solution ICP-MS data than normalization to NIST 612. … etc. … etc. …
    — — —
    Unfortunately I don't believe in this way (for the Shroud !) …

  2. piero
    September 29, 2014 at 10:53 am

    Using the following words:

    site:members.iinet.net.au/~sejones/ “Shroud of Turin” dirt strontium

    I have found:

    >12 Nov 2008 …
    >Unclassified Shroud of Turin quotes added by me in November 2008. …
    > … found particles of aragonite with small amounts of strontium and iron …

    But this claim is too general and does not solve our problem!
    — — —
    Then, try under :
    http://www.gm.univ-montp2.fr/IMG/pdf/Hathorne_al_2003_G3_.pdf

    We have developed a technique to determine the variability of trace elements (including Li, B, Na, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr and Ba) within foraminifera tests using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique has a high spatial resolution (width 40–80 mm, depth >0.5 mm), is reproducible (<8% external reproducibility) and has low detection limits (generally <0.05 mg g1). We demonstrate that normalization of data to a calcite standard usually gives results that are more consistent
    with solution ICP-MS data than normalization to NIST 612. … … etc. … etc … …

    For example : see the bibliography:

    Allison, N.,
    Comparative determinations of trace and minor
    elements in coral aragonite by ion microprobe analysis, with
    preliminary results from Phuket, southern Thailand, Geochim.
    Cosmochim. Acta, 60, 3457–3470, 1996

    and
    Jeffries, T. E., S. E. Jackson, and H. P. Longerich,
    Application of a frequency quintupled Nd: YAG source (l = 213nm) for
    laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometic
    analysis of minerals, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 13, 935–940,
    1998.
    — — —
    What is your opinion about laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometic
    analysis ?
    I don't believe in that for the Shroud …

  3. piero
    September 29, 2014 at 10:55 am

    Using
    site:members.iinet.net.au/~sejones/ “Shroud of Turin” dirt strontium
    I have found:

    12 Nov 2008 …
    Unclassified Shroud of Turin quotes added by me in November 2008. …
    found particles of aragonite with small amounts of strontium and iron …

    But this claim is too general and does not solve our problem!
    — — —
    Then, try under :
    http://www.gm.univ-montp2.fr/IMG/pdf/Hathorne_al_2003_G3_.pdf

    We have developed a technique to determine the variability of trace elements (including Li, B, Na, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr and Ba) within foraminifera tests using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique has a high spatial resolution (width 40–80 mm, depth >0.5 mm), is reproducible (<8% external reproducibility) and has low detection limits (generally <0.05 mg g 1). We demonstrate that normalization of data to a calcite standard usually gives results that are more consistent
    with solution ICP-MS data than normalization to NIST 612. … … etc. … etc … …

    For example : see the bibliography:

    Allison, N.,
    Comparative determinations of trace and minor
    elements in coral aragonite by ion microprobe analysis, with
    preliminary results from Phuket, southern Thailand, Geochim.
    Cosmochim. Acta, 60, 3457–3470, 1996

    and
    Jeffries, T. E., S. E. Jackson, and H. P. Longerich,
    Application
    of a frequency quintupled Nd: YAG source (l = 213nm) for
    laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometic
    analysis of minerals, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 13, 935–940,
    1998.

    What is your opinion ?
    I don't believe in that kind of analysis for the shroud
    !

  4. piero
    September 29, 2014 at 10:57 am

    Using
    the words:

    site:members.iinet.net.au/~sejones/ “Shroud of Turin” dirt strontium

    I have found:

    >12 Nov 2008 …
    Unclassified Shroud of Turin quotes added by me in November 2008. …
    found particles of aragonite with small amounts of strontium and iron …

    But this claim is too general and does not solve our problem!
    — — —
    Then, try under :
    http://www.gm.univ-montp2.fr/IMG/pdf/Hathorne_al_2003_G3_.pdf

    We have developed a technique to determine the variability of trace elements (including Li, B, Na, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr and Ba) within foraminifera tests using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique has a high spatial resolution (width 40–80 mm, depth >0.5 mm), is reproducible (<8% external reproducibility) and has low detection limits (generally <0.05 mg g 1). We demonstrate that normalization of data to a calcite standard usually gives results that are more consistent
    with solution ICP-MS data than normalization to NIST 612. … … etc. … etc … …

    For example : see the bibliography:

    Allison, N.,
    Comparative determinations of trace and minor
    elements in coral aragonite by ion microprobe analysis, with
    preliminary results from Phuket, southern Thailand, Geochim.
    Cosmochim. Acta, 60, 3457–3470, 1996

    and
    Jeffries, T. E., S. E. Jackson, and H. P. Longerich,
    Application
    of a frequency quintupled Nd: YAG source (l = 213nm) for
    laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometic
    analysis of minerals, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 13, 935–940, 1998.
    ————–
    What is your opinion ?
    I don’t believe in that kind of analyses for the Shroud …

  5. piero
    September 29, 2014 at 10:58 am

    Using
    site:members.iinet.net.au/~sejones/ “Shroud of Turin” dirt strontium
    I have found:

    12 Nov 2008 …
    Unclassified Shroud of Turin quotes added by me in November 2008. …
    found particles of aragonite with small amounts of strontium and iron …

    But this claim is too general and does not solve our problem!
    — — —
    Then, try under :
    http://www.gm.univ-montp2.fr/IMG/pdf/Hathorne_al_2003_G3_.pdf

    We have developed a technique to determine the variability of trace elements (including Li, B, Na, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr and Ba) within foraminifera tests using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique has a high spatial resolution (width 40–80 mm, depth >0.5 mm), is reproducible (<8% external reproducibility) and has low detection limits (generally <0.05 mg g 1). We demonstrate that normalization of data to a calcite standard usually gives results that are more consistent
    with solution ICP-MS data than normalization to NIST 612. … … etc. … etc … …

    For example : see the bibliography:

    Allison, N.,
    Comparative determinations of trace and minor
    elements in coral aragonite by ion microprobe analysis, with
    preliminary results from Phuket, southern Thailand, Geochim.
    Cosmochim. Acta, 60, 3457–3470, 1996

    and
    Jeffries, T. E., S. E. Jackson, and H. P. Longerich,
    Application
    of a frequency quintupled Nd: YAG source (l = 213nm) for
    laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometic
    analysis of minerals, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 13, 935–940, 1998.
    ————–
    What is your opinion ?
    I don’t believe in that kind of analyses for the Shroud …

  6. piero
    September 29, 2014 at 10:59 am

    An useless work
    because

    Using
    site:members.iinet.net.au/~sejones/ “Shroud of Turin” dirt strontium
    I have found:

    12 Nov 2008 …
    Unclassified Shroud of Turin quotes added by me in November 2008. …
    found particles of aragonite with small amounts of strontium and iron …

    But this claim is too general and does not solve our problem!
    — — —
    Then, try under :
    http://www.gm.univ-montp2.fr/IMG/pdf/Hathorne_al_2003_G3_.pdf

    We have developed a technique to determine the variability of trace elements (including Li, B, Na, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr and Ba) within foraminifera tests using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique has a high spatial resolution (width 40–80 mm, depth >0.5 mm), is reproducible (<8% external reproducibility) and has low detection limits (generally <0.05 mg g 1). We demonstrate that normalization of data to a calcite standard usually gives results that are more consistent
    with solution ICP-MS data than normalization to NIST 612. … … etc. … etc … …

    For example : see the bibliography:

    Allison, N.,
    Comparative determinations of trace and minor
    elements in coral aragonite by ion microprobe analysis, with
    preliminary results from Phuket, southern Thailand, Geochim.
    Cosmochim. Acta, 60, 3457–3470, 1996

    and
    Jeffries, T. E., S. E. Jackson, and H. P. Longerich,
    Application
    of a frequency quintupled Nd: YAG source (l = 213nm) for
    laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometic
    analysis of minerals, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 13, 935–940, 1998.
    ————–
    What is your opinion ?
    I don’t believe in that kind of analyses for the Shroud …

  7. piero
    September 30, 2014 at 8:35 am

    Dear Dan, I am deeply dismayed for what happened yesterday!
    I apologize, but I was trying to send, and after sending I waited and did not get an answer! Here is the simple explanation for the annoying repetition of similar messages.
    Maybe there were line problems or other causes.
    I hope that this never happens again.
    — — —
    Here what I have found surfing the Web today:

    >1. – Where were the Jerusalem samples taken?
    Dr. Nitowsky (Sr. Damian of the Cross) sampled in Israel, nine sites which included:
    1. Emmaus; 2. Jericho, at Herod’s palace; 3. Qumran ; 4. Beth Shan ; 5 Sepphoris; 6 and 7 Beth She’arim; 8 Jerusalem; 9. Mt Carmel”. The Jerusalem samples are further identified as in the École Biblique tomb complex and more particularly from the bench of the tomb.”

    >2. … … omitted … …

    >3. – How was the Aragonite identified from Jerusalem?
    >Kohlbeck analysed with the microscope thin sections of the Jerusalem tomb and he concluded was Aragonite. The strongest way to distinguish Aragonite from Calcite is the X-ray diffraction to determine the crystalline structure. However, this test was never mentioned. But Kohlbeck should be able to recognize through the microscope the aragonite versus the common calcite. Nevertheless, this is not the key question because actually, Aragonite is very spread and very common. It should be easy to find Aragonite in the Jerusalem rock and in the Shroud too and its presence in the Shroud cannot be taken as a clue of its stay in Jerusalem. Only specific traces (iron and strontium) could give an indicative fingerprint. Kohlbeck applied the X-Ray fluorescence method to detect traces of iron and strontium and being not able to find lead.
    It is the further analysis conducted by Dr. Riccardo Levi-Setti through his high-resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy that provided the true “little DNA” or “finger print” to be compared with the samples of the Shroud (fibers).

    link:
    http://www.holyshroudguild.org/cesar2.html
    — — —
    SIMS
    link:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secondary_ion_mass_spectrometry
    — — —
    >Ion microprobes, also known as secondary ion mass spectrometers (SIMS), use a finely focused ion beam to probe a selected sample domain. A small percentage of the material sputtered from the polished surface of the sample is ionized, and these ions are accelerated into a mass spectrometer where they are separated according to their mass-over-charge ratio. An important characteristic of SIMS is its high sensitivity compared to other microbeam sampling techniques: the ability to count individual ions results in detection limits in the parts-per-billion range for many elements. Also the fact that ions derived from the sample are separated by their mass-over-charge ratio allows isotopic analyses to be performed on test portion masses that can be as small as 200 picograms.

    Link:
    http://www.gfz-potsdam.de/en/research/organizational-units/departments/department-4/inorganic-and-isotope-geochemistry/infrastructure/secondary-ion-mass-spectrometry-sims/

    Do you know the dimensions and volumes of the craters produced
    during secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis ?

    — — —
    Super-SIMS (SIMS = Secondary ion mass spectrometry) – also called Accelerator-SIMS or Trace Element AMS (TREAMS) – is an ultrasensitive analytical method for the determination of stable elements and isotopes.
    Due to the acceleration of the extracted sample ions to MeV-energies and their charge reversal from negative to positive ions, Super-SIMS can reach about 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower detection limits (up to 10-12 or ppt, highly depending on analyte and matrix) as conventional SIMS. …

    Link:
    http://www.hzdr.de/db/Cms?pNid=2809

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