Home > Carbon 14 Dating, People, Quotations > Quote of the Year: Al Adler on the Carbon Dating of the Shroud of Turin

Quote of the Year: Al Adler on the Carbon Dating of the Shroud of Turin

December 17, 2013

Joe Marino writes:

I rediscovered an old radio interview with Adler that I forgot I had.  It was on a program called Dreamland and was broadcast in May 1999, as the interviewer mentioned the upcoming conference that was to be held the next month in Richmond, Virginia.  There’s nothing really new in it, but what I found surprising is that it sounds like Adler blamed the C-14 labs instead of the Turin authorities for the choice of the C-14 sample.  But of course the more important aspect is what Adler thought of the sample itself.  The interviewer asked Adler what he thought was at the heart of the problem from his point of view regarding the C-14 test.  He said:

imageI was on the original protocol committee and we demanded that the test be only precise but it be accurate.  Precise is how repeatable a measurement is.  The radiocarbon people did a good job with precision.  But they did not do a good job with accuracy.  Accuracy is how true it is.  And where they screwed up was taking the original sample.  If you’re only going to take one sample, which is all they did, you have to be sure that the sample you take is typical of the rest of the cloth.  Since this is a sample that came from a waterstained, scorched area that showed repairs on one edge, you already have a right to challenge whether it was going to be accurate.  On top of that, you have the infrared work, which shows it doesn’t have the same composition, so clearly there’s no proof that it’s accurate.

The photograph is from Alan D. Adler and The Shroud of Turin, a webpage written by his daughter, Chris.

  1. Louis
    December 17, 2013 at 8:25 am

    This is more ammunition for the pro-authenticity camp, whose arsenal is always open. Dr. Alan Adler knew he could not blame Turin and presume he had the clerics in mind. The mess in Turin began with Professor Luigi Gonella, who did away with the protocols, and Professor Giovanni Riggi, who took just one sample and from the wrong site. Dr. Adler must have noticed that the representatives of the C-14 labs kept quiet while Professors Gonella and Riggi were arguing — for some two hours it seems — about from where the sample had to be taken. What was the reason for this?

  2. December 17, 2013 at 8:22 pm

    Bravo Al! Bravo.

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