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Archive for February, 2010

A Green Shroud of Turin Exhibition

February 26, 2010 Comments off

Note the green, bold text below in this story by Chiara Santomiero of Zenit News (Zenit.org):

TURIN, Italy, FEB. 24, 2010More than a million pilgrims have made reservations to view the Shroud of Turin when it is displayed this April in the city’s cathedral.

The shroud — believed to be the cloth Christ was buried in — will be on display April 10-23 at the Turin Cathedral. The last time it was displayed was 10 years ago.

Nearly a million reservations have been made by Italians alone. Other reservations have come from Argentina, Burkina Faso, Japan and Russia.
 
Some 4,500 volunteers are currently training to help with the logistics. “Those who collaborate in this event do so for free,” said Maurizio Bardello, director of the Committee for the Exposition of the Holy Shroud. The organization “has been guided by criteria of sobriety and expected costs. A wide use of recyclable material is planned.”

The director added that some permanent renovations are under way, such as a remodeling of the Chiablese Palace, where pilgrims will be able to attend Eucharistic Adoration and receive the sacrament of confession.

Planning green

In addition to the use of recyclables, other environmentally friendly plans are being made.

“To reduce the effect on the city of the arrival of close to 20,000 expected buses, each one will be asked for a contribution of €30 destined exclusively to plant new trees,” said Bardello.

 

Why was the Shroud of Turin saved?

February 25, 2010 Comments off

I keep encountering this thought.

But logic dictates, His followers did not just leave the
cloth there on the ground, to be thrown away. This was the
cloth which held the Body of Jesus.

The main reason the cloth would not have been discarded or left behind may have to do with Jewish customs pertaining to blood that was shed in death. Such spilled blood, scholars believe, should be buried with the body. But what if the tomb was open and there was no body, just an empty burial shroud stained with blood?

Modern sensibilities might suggest that the most logical course of action would be to reseal the tomb was a burial shroud inside. But is that what religious Jews in the first century might have done? We just don’t know the answer to that. If the shroud is authentic, then of course that is not what happened. For more information see Shroud of Turin Story

Mpelembe :: The Shroud of Turin – Shrouded in mystery?.

Shroud of Turin doesn’t match Bible’s words

February 25, 2010 2 comments

Bloomington’s Pantagraph newspaper will absolutely has carried a recent AP story about the 1 million people would already made reservations to see the shroud of Turin in April and May of this year. One of the newspaper’s readers wrote a letter to the editor as follows:

While perusing your newspaper of Feb. 20, I noticed that you had included an article about the Shroud of Turin — always a subject of controversy, since it has not been absolutely proven that it is indeed the burial cloth of Jesus.

The idea that the church still promotes it, doesn’t make it fact. After checking with various Bible readings about the Messiah, Isaiah 50:6 states that his beard would be plucked out. Thus, that would make the shroud questionable since it shows a bearded Christ.

Carl D. Mathis, Clinton

Of course, there is always the possibility that the shroud is real and Mr. Mathis’ interpretation of a bit of prophecy from Isaiah is wrong, if not just a little bit too literal. That’s my bet.

See: Shroud of Turin doesn’t match Bible’s words

Shropshire Anglican Church to Exhibit Shroud of Turin Copy with Lecture

February 25, 2010 2 comments

Being an Episcopalian, its good to see this sort of attention for the Shroud of Turin in Anglican churches. I am familiar with the full-size cotton copies (the original shroud is linen) created by Barrie Schwortz. They are excellent.

A full-size copy of the world-famous Turin Shroud, one of only six in the world, is coming to Shropshire next week.

Actually, one of only six full-size cloth copies.

The copy of what is said to be the burial cloth of Jesus Christ is an image printed on cotton created by Barrie Shwortz, who was the official photographer for the Shroud Research Project in 1978. It will be exhibited in St Chad’s Church in Shrewsbury from 5pm on Wednesday until noon on March 8.

The copy will be displayed together with various artefacts from Biblical times, and a series of modern paintings by Paul Hill depicting the Stations of the Cross.

The exhibition has been organised by the Friends of St Chad’s Shrewsbury to raise funds for repairs to the tower.

The event will open with a lecture on the shroud by Pam Moon, lay minister at St Peter’s Anglican Church, Little Aston, Birmingham, where her husband is vicar.

Mrs Moon has had a lifelong fascination with the Shroud of Turin and owns the copy which is to be exhibited.

She said: “I was deeply moved when I first saw the full-length images.

“It is possible to get an idea of the shroud from television pictures, books, magazines and newspapers articles, but seeing it in its entirety is profoundly challenging.”

For more information see: http://www.shropshirestar.com/2010/02/25/turin-shroud-copy-on-display-in-county/

Leonardo da Vinci and the Shroud of Turin

February 24, 2010 Comments off

Good grief, this keeps coming up.

The Man Behind the Shroud?
There is a very credible theory that Leonardo created the Shroud of Turin by a photographic technique. Could it be his face?

First of all, there are no silver or chromium-based substances on the Shroud. Chemically, it is not a photograph. Second, a photograph does create a height-field image (3D data). The image on the Shroud is a height-field. Third, Leonardo was born in 1452. The Shroud that is now in Turin was displayed in Lirey, France in 1356. Fourth, there is compelling evidence that the Shroud that is now in Turin was in Constantinople in A.D. 944 and Edessa as early as 544. (See: What is the history of the Shroud in the Greek-Byzantine Period?

Radio carbon dating of the fabric of the shroud places it a while before Leonardo’s birth so clearly in is a medieval fake as were many relicks. Leonardo wasn’t stupid; if he were to try to fake it he would have used old cloth so the dating is consistent.

I suppose that this was because he knew carbon dating was to invented 500 years later.

Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa and the Shroud of Turin | World in Christ Christian Gathering Place

Anti-Catholic Site Buying Google Ads on the Shroud of Turin

February 24, 2010 Comments off

This is what the ad reads:

The Shroud of Turin: The Bible says it’s a forged image
of a fake Jesus from a false church

A little bit of searching on the website finds this entry:

Controversy and debate have raged over the Shroud of Turin since it was "discovered" around 1355 in a French village. Supposed scientific examinations have argued both for and against the authenticity of the cloth. No one could explain the source of the image on the cloth until recently. But all the effort, time, and expense could have been saved. The inspired history of the Bible provides valuable facts that condemn the Shroud as a fraud. Bible Christians can rejoice in the light of Scripture!

I’m not quite sure that I know where the Bible condemns the Shroud of Turin. Read more on this site and discover that the Bible seems to condemn just about everything else. Yes, it is true, you can prove just about anything with the Bible by ignoring what it really says.

Categories: News & Views

Good Shroud of Turin Quote

February 24, 2010 1 comment

Hat tip to  The BlaBla Blog

Shortly before his death, Ray Rogers said:

The worst possible sample for carbon dating was taken. It consisted of different materials than were used in the shroud itself, so the age we produced was inaccurate. I am coming to the conclusion that it has a very good chance of being the piece of cloth that was used to bury the historic Jesus.

For more information on the dating of the Shroud of Turin see Shroud of Turin Story

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