The Wabash Shroudie

imageEric Olson and a cameraman for 21 Alive, a local ABC affiliate in the Wabash area, have posted a wonderful story, Wabash Man to open Museum on Shroud of Turin. The story  along with some really excellent video is on the station’s website. The Wabash man, as all American shroudies know, is everyone’s friend, Richard Orareo:

imageWABASH, Indiana (21Alive)  –  It is the most iconic relic of the Christian faith…the Shroud of Turin…the linen cloth many believe covered the body of Christ as it lay in the tomb. A cloth on which the image of a man, battered and bloodied, is inexorably etched on the surface. A relic venerated the world over, and particularly in one corner of 21 country.

In Wabash Indiana, in what was once the founder of the Honeywell Corporation Mark Honeywell’s private movie theatre, Richard Orareo is building the National Museum of the Holy Shroud.

Orareo is a former educator, a devoted Catholic and for forty years now a prolific collector of images, books and relics related to the Shroud of Turin.

The Shroud was brought from the Holy Land to Europe during the Crusades. It spent centuries in the care of the House of Savoy, the royal family of the Italian state of Turin, who bequeathed it to the Pope in 1983. Orareo’s collection includes rare photographs, including the first ever taken of the Shroud in 1898. Rare silk images of the Shroud dating back to the 15th century. This small box contains relics, pieces of bone, from the four Apostles Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. But it is that image, that face burned onto the linen cloth that is the real focus of his life’s work.

The video runs for about three minutes. It is worth your time.

The Wabash Museum of the Holy Shroud

imageEd Breen, co-host of “Good Morning Grant County” on the radio, who has been reporting on life in Indiana for 48 years writes in The News Herald:

In your youth, particularly at this time of year, when friends and relatives would gather for dinner at the homestead, you were probably cautioned to discuss neither politics nor religion at the dinner table. Bring up either and you are courting dispute and discontent.
To that list you might now add the Shroud of Turin, a piece of linen cloth three and a half feet wide and a little over 14 feet long. To those of a particular Christian faith, this aged fabric is the cloth in which the body of Jesus Christ was wrapped after his crucifixion and from which he emerged at the moment of the resurrection on the third day.

To those of a more skeptical faith, it is an object worthy of pious veneration. Genuine, perhaps, but perhaps not. To those whose skepticism flows to cynicism and those not of the Christian faith, it may well be interpreted as a great and ancient medieval fraud, a hoax of elaborate and artistic proportions.

This simple fact is indisputable: This piece of cloth and its embedded image of a man, whose record can be traced quite clearly to the year 1390 and perhaps earlier, this shroud has been preserved, studied, examined, revered, embraced, denied and enshrined more than any swatch of fabric in human history.

Now a vast archive of science, literature, history, art and documentation dealing with the Shroud of Turin—so named because it has been preserved in the northern Italian city of Turin (or “Torino,” in Italian) for 700 years—has found a permanent home just up the road in Wabash, in a beautiful, 8,000-square-foot, Tudor-style building built by Wabash native and industrialist Mark Honeywell in the 1920s. This library of materials is on the grounds of what was the Honeywell estate, later the Wabash Country Club, north of Wabash on State Road 15.

It is in the custody—indeed, it is the life blood—of a transplanted Boston Italian, a man not only of faith but also of determination. His name is Richard Orareo. . . .

  1. Keep reading article.
  2. Visit the museum’s website.

SEAM is Closing Today: The End of an Era?

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As we read on the website today: “Museum Closing After Sunday 8/10/2014 until we relocate.”

Writes Pete Schumacher:

Shroud Exhibit and Museum (SEAM) is forced to move or close operations by September 1, 2014. For 5 and-a-half years, White Sands Mall has generously donated 1900 square feet of prime facilities including all utilities to the Shroud Exhibit and Museum. Recent success has brought them many new paying tenants and they have been able to lease the space in which we have been operating since our opening.

We are very thankful to the owners of White Sands Mall, and to the staff that manages and maintains the mall, for without this generous gift SEAM would not have come into existence. We congratulate them on their success and wish them every success in the future.

So, now it is time to either start a new chapter for the exhibit and museum or end its operations. What happens is up to this community. Your help is needed if we are to continue.

We have a very limited budget. We do not charge fees to enter the exhibit. Nobody is paid to work for SEAM. We are an all-volunteer organization in staff and management. Therefore we need a space that is rent-free and utility-free to the extent possible. The location should be in a commercial area where shopping or tourism is dominate and must be a place where children and staff are in a safe environment.

SEAM is now world famous. Visitors come from Mexico and from neighboring states and communities for the sole purpose of visiting the museum. Some have come from other countries, including France and Panama Central America just to experience the Shroud of Turin through this unique exhibit. The exhibit clearly defines the role of New Mexico science and scientists in the history of the Shroud. It has been good for tourism and good for pride in our community of Alamogordo. On the Internet, over 60,000 visitors and 95 countries have spent time learning about all of this. Many hearts have been converted and souls have been set back onto right path.

If there is any way you can help us, please contact us immediately. Thank you.

Yours in Christ, Deacon Pete Schumacher; Phone: 415-5206; ShroudNM.com