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A Shameless Plug

June 23, 2015

Your words, Colin; not mine.

imageWe find Colin Berry, who has once again quit this blog forever for the umpteenth time, now posting in DISQUS. He is plugging his latest theory.

Here we go a quoting from DISQUS:

Title: "The Pope" … "sad world of make believe"

.

Colin is referring to a story in The Telegraph, The Pope joins the EU in a sad world of make-believe by Christopher Booker. It is an opinion piece about Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si’. It is not about the shroud. Not at all.

Who cares, Colin, right? Let’s trollishly intrude!

So Colin continues:

Fiddlesticks. For one moment I thought that might be a reference to his paying homage to the Shroud of Turin, allowing one shamelessly to plug (without splitting an infinitive) the latest Blue Peter "Make Your Own Turin Shroud" shamelessly immodest breakthrough discovery.

[…]

Simply paint a gluey cold water slurry of plain white flour onto one’s 3D subject – whether a real person or a bas relief (probably the latter for the face), imprint onto linen, then press the dried imprint with a really hot iron (linen setting). Hey presto, one gets a negative sepia-coloured Shroud-like image of one’s subject. Nope, it won’t wash out, so may well be permanent. It may even display those ‘mysterious’ 3D properties if you use dowloadable software (ImageJ etc) that excels in finding "3D" wherever there’s tonal contrast in one’s 2D image.

Maybe the children’s show will send Colin an honorary iron-on Blue Peter patch.

Read about Colin’s latest hypothesis, A new and simple thermal imprinting model for the Turin Shroud needing only plain white flour and a hot iron – in 12 pictures.

Categories: Image Theory
  1. June 23, 2015 at 6:39 am

    I have a new posting: The Pope, the Apocalypse and the Shroud which may be in point. http://quantumchrist-jck.blogspot.com/
    (It’s free!!)

  2. June 23, 2015 at 1:44 pm

    White flour? Medieval white flour?

  3. Thibault HEIMBURGER
    June 23, 2015 at 2:54 pm

    From Colin in “the Telegraph”: “Simply paint a gluey cold water slurry of plain white flour onto one’s 3D subject – whether a real person or a bas relief (probably the latter for the face), imprint onto linen, then press the dried imprint with a really hot iron (linen setting). Hey presto, one gets a negative sepia-coloured Shroud-like image of one’s subject. Nope, it won’t wash out, so may well be permanent. It may even display those ‘mysterious’ 3D properties if you use dowloadable software (ImageJ etc) that excels in finding “3D” wherever there’s tonal contrast in one’s 2D image.”

    Colin seems to be a very strange person.

    Here and on his own blog he looks like a true scientist.

    Now, in “the Telegraph” (!!), we have the very simple final answer.

    No Colin, your results have nothing to do with the TS image properties.

    Is Colin serious or not ?

    • anoxie
      June 24, 2015 at 1:24 am

      “Mechanism of enhanced browning in image zone? Presumably a non-enzymatic Maillard browning reaction between reducing sugars and proteins.”

      A “shamelessly immodest breakthrough discovery”, any resemblance to theories of scientists living or dead is purely accidental.

      “Is Colin serious or not ?”

      Are you serious Thibault?

  4. daveb of wellington nz
    June 23, 2015 at 11:38 pm

    Paulette’s terse comment may be relevant. As a food chemist, Colin would know that there are hundreds of varieties of flour (yes, hundreds). Presumably he was using a modern flour as available from his local supermarket. It has to be asked how can he be sure that the flour he used was a reasonably close match with what was generally available in medieval times. How can he know that his results were not affected by any one of the various additives commonly used to affect the properties of the flour?

    In the 1930s, some flour began to be enriched with iron, niacin, thiamine and riboflavin. In the 1940s, mills started to enrich flour and folic acid was added to the list in the 1990s. Might we presume that Colin’s flour was of this type?

    In stone ground flour, it is not uncommon for stone chips from the mill stones to find their way into the flour and they have to be removed. Did the medieval millers know about this? During the Industrial Revolution it was discovered that flour would become rancid and had a limited shelf life. The fatty acids from the germ begin to react with oxygen from the moment they are milled. In the 19th century, removing the germ was the effective solution. What was the solution in medieval times, or did the flour always have to be fresh, and was the germ left intact?

    Medieval flour in Europe commonly had a high rye content. Do the results still work with rye flour? Bleaching additives are now commonly used, but are prohibited in some regimes.

    Colin would know that what we may consider as a simple ingredient, is in fact quite a complex substance, which has varied over the course of history and is variable in different cultures. He needs to ensure that the flour he has been using conforms to what was available in medieval times, and is representative of presumably what was then European type flour.

    Check Wiki for just how variable flour can be:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flour

  5. Max patrick Hamon
    June 24, 2015 at 6:16 am

    Re-post: Could now Colin Berry tell us how one can get the Turin Shroud double bloodied body imprint that is neat and tidy blood rivulet and bloodied wound decals along with ventral and dorsal negative permanent fuzzy and faint yet fairly translucent straw-yellow-coloured 3D very superficial imprints of one’s subject?

  6. chuck hampton
    June 24, 2015 at 10:49 am

    The article is fun to read but leaves out the two insurmountable problems of the blood and the image depth and uniformity.

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