Colin Berry has some preliminary results

imageClick in to his site to see First test of the quicklime hypothesis (Turin Shroud image) – in pictures.  Don’t knock him for having produced only scorch marks and not an image yet. Who really has, so far?  Nicholas Allen, Joe Nickell,  Craig-Bresee, Luigi Garlaschelli?  Actually, Colin has with hot metal. Let’s see where he goes with this.

Experimentation is always a step forward no matter the results.

In this case only a qualified chemist who knows what he is doing should be experimenting this way.

Maybe a New Image Hypothesis?

clip_image001Colin Berry never ceases to amaze with Might the Shroud image have been produced as a thermochemical scorch on linen? Quicklime?

[ . . . ] Given that a dead body does not produce sufficient heat to scorch linen (for which a temperature of 200 degrees Celsius or more is required) then the thinking so far has been that an effigy of a real person, e.g. a bronze statue, was deployed. However, I’m as conscious as the next man of the practical difficulties of imprinting successfully off a life-size effigy. Mistakes would be costly, given the price of quality linen,

So this morning, I got to wondering about alternatives to metal templates that have been heated, say, over coals. Might an exothermic reaction using a chemical have been used instead – but a common one available in medieval times?

He definitely wants you to look at this blog. You should.