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The Shroud Codex Revisited

December 7, 2010

imageJeffrey Mirus doesn’t like Jerome Corsi’s The Shroud Codex. In Catholic Culture he wrote:

Jerome Corsi’s novel The Shroud Codex is a sustained examination of the evidence for the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin. Unfortunately, this evidence is presented in a work of fiction, so the reader has no way of knowing if the evidence is real or fanciful. This is a dubious way to promote the Shroud, and it is a complete failure as a novel.

I disagree. Too bad that MIrus is just getting around to this. Way, way back in April, I wrote, Big Recommendation as follows:

imageThe Shroud Codex is a novel, but a novel you can learn from. Just as you can learn a great deal of history from well-written historical novels, you can learn a great deal about the Shroud of Turin from The Shroud Codex. If you know everything there is to know about the Shroud, it is still a wonderfully gripping, enjoyable novel. Read it for fun. You will be glad you did.

After writing a review I went to the web to read other reviews. There are not many yet since the book was just released yesterday. But what I found was completely positive. One review said what I had to say so much better than I could do so that I decided to quote from it and throw away what I wrote. Jean Heimann in Catholic Fire wrote:

The Shroud Codex is a compelling and intriguing mystery, which mesmerizes the reader from the very first page. It is a book that is hard to put down, as the reader is driven to learn the truth about the Shroud of Turin and the impact that it has on the lives of the characters.

What seems most interesting and unique to me about The Shroud Codex is the fact that it contains a variety of genres, thus, making it appealing to a wide audience. It could be included in all of the following categories: religion and spirituality, history, science, science fiction, the paranormal, and mystery. Because of this, I believe that it will attract believers as well as non—believers alike who want to learn more about this ancient, fragile, bloodstained cloth, that many believe to be the actual burial cloth of Jesus Christ.

Read it yourself. Draw your own conclusions:

Categories: Books, Press Coverage
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