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Posts Tagged ‘shroud of turin’

The Rings of Saturn

October 1, 2014 2 comments

imageIn an opinion piece, Stu Salkeld, editor of the St. Albert Gazette, writes:

Some people would be astounded to know how far back the tourism industry stretches. Some claim it stretches back to the 14th century in Europe, when a preponderance of holy relics appeared rather suddenly. The number and diversity were impressive: the Shroud of Turin, said to be Jesus Christ’s image on his burial shroud, which was unheard of until the relic trade began in the 1300s, the Sudarium of the Lord, a facecloth that is said to have captured Christ’s profile after he died on the cross, the Spear of Destiny, which a Roman centurion wielded as he stabbed Christ on the cross (four of these currently exist in Europe) and probably the least known, the Holy Prepuce, or Holy Foreskin.

[. . . ]

The medieval relic trade was profitable. Pilgrims from across Christendom travelled what, at the time, were rather dangerous roads to visit cities such as Turin that held artifacts said to be associated with Christ, the saints or other holy figures and while they were on the road pilgrims spent a lot of shekels, much as modern tourists do today. However, the authenticity of many relics was almost immediately called into question, even by the church itself. For example, in a 1389 letter, Bishop Pierre D’Arcis denounced the Shroud of Turin as a fraud to Clement VII.

Some claim; is that transparent bias?  Can you spot the history mistakes?

Why the picture of Saturn? Read the article.

The Metamorphosis and Manipulation of a Legend?

September 26, 2014 3 comments

imageAndrea Nicolotti’s book, From the Mandylion of Edessa to the Shroud of Turin: The Metamorphosis and Manipulation of a Legend (Art and Material Culture in Medieval and Renaissance Europe) has finally been published in English. It was available in Italian in 2011. Andrea, who has commented in this blog on occasion, considers this to be a “revised and augmented edition.”

The price for the Hardcover edition is $124.00 at Amazon. The list price is $142.00.  (Please note that Amazon is reporting that the book has not been released even though the publication date is September 15th. Nonetheless, Amazon is accepting orders at this time).

A limited preview of the first chapter and the conclusion from the last chapter is available at Academia.org. The Table of Contents and Index are also provided.

The whet your appetite here are three paragraphs from the conclusion:

There is not a shred of evidence that the Mandylion of Edessa was a long shroud or that it showed the entire body of the crucified and wounded figure of Christ. Those who argue for the shared identity of the Shroud of Turin and the Mandylion of Edessa have based their arguments on evidence that cannot withstand close scrutiny. In order to argue for the authenticity of the Turinese relic, some have gone to great lengths. In so doing, they have approached the changing nature of the legends concerning this relic too simplistically. More-over, they have used evolving legends as if they were trustworthy historical sources, which is utterly unacceptable.

It is clear that the ultimate aim of the theory that identifies the Shroud with the Mandylion is to demonstrate that the Shroud of Turin has existed and can be documented since antiquity. But the first historical documents that mention the Shroud date to the fourteenth century, and the date obtained by radiocarbon dating places it between 1260 and 1390 CE. The history of the Shroud is the topic of my next book, but it is important to clarify that even if the Shroud was authentic and dated from the first century, it is a completely different object than the Edessean image.

We can therefore end this analysis by quoting the 1786 opinion of the Marquis Giovanni de Serpos, in regard to the reliability of that “sweet illusion” and the “birth of a devout imagination” in the legend of Abgar: “Everything so far narrated must be counted as mere fable.”

Order it today and Amazon will ship it the minute it becomes available. I look forward to reading this book and his next book on the history of the Shroud.

The Tour of Nine Replicas Continues

September 17, 2014 1 comment

The Reporter News in Hatfield, Pennsylvania, offers a headline, a picture and a photo caption:

The Headline: Faithful turn out in Hatfield to see a replica of the Shroud of Turin

The Photo Caption:  Anna Marie Parsons leans down to touch a replica of the Shroud of Turin on display at St. Maria Goretti Church in Hatfield on Sunday evening. Pope Benedict XVI approved nine replicas of the Shroud of Turin and then individually blessed the cloths. Each cloth was sent on tours all around the world.

The Trimurti of the Italian scientific-experimental studies on the Shroud

September 4, 2014 69 comments

Expecting some news accounts out of Bari?

imageHere is a rough Google translation from the Amici della Sindone (Friends of the Shroud) Facebook page. They are starting to arrive in Bari:

Originally they were 3, then 4 … there will be several others (and others), but they were scattered here and there … so here’s to you, for now, the Trimurti [great trinity, threesome, triad] of the Italian scientific-experimental studies on the Shroud of Turin, [and] the more gregarious one from Spain

Categories: Event Tags: ,

You might think St. Louis was all about Gary Habermas

September 3, 2014 9 comments

and newer testing in Italy and teeth showing through

imageBy the time the folk over at the Christian Post toyed with the press release the story took on a completely different character.

"[The teeth] are on the inside, but on the photo
they are showing outside. Whichever  way
[the radiation] is coming, it dragged the image
from the inside to the outside."

The first paragraph is okay:

The keynote speakers include Bruno Barberis, director of the International Center of Sindonology in Turin, as well as the Most Rev. Michael John Sheridan, bishop of the Diocese of Colorado Springs. The conference is set to open with renowned shroud lecturer Russ Breault.

[ . . . ]

Initial tests conducted in 1988 in Arizona, Oxford and Zurich supported the theory that the shroud is a forgery created in the Middle Ages, somewhere between 1260 and 1390, but later tests in 2011 by Italy’s National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Development came to the conclusion that the relic could not have possibly been replicated by the technology available at that time.

Gary Habermas, distinguished research professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy and Theology at Liberty University, led a presentation in 2013 at the Southern Evangelical Seminary’s 20th annual Christian Apologetics Conference and discussed enhanced images of the shroud which showed that the person’s teeth were showing through the skin.

"His skin is intact, his beard is intact, but you are able to see what’s inside coming out, just like if you are able to see what’s on the back of a hand," Habermas said during the presentation, while showing a photo of an exposed human skull juxtapositioned next to the head of the man in the shroud, with the teeth from the two images aligned.

"This is one of the best indications that the man in the Shroud, who was dead and was crucified, [has] radiation coming out," he said of the teeth discovery. "And if that’s what this is, you’ve got something from the inside [coming out].

"[The teeth] are on the inside, but on the photo they are showing outside. Whichever way [the radiation] is coming, it dragged the image from the inside to the outside."

An Experiment with Overlay

September 3, 2014 1 comment

O.K. is going to discuss the following images through comments. Join him. I’ll be interested to see where this goes. (Click on any picture to see it in larger form. 


Fresco

Fresco


Fresco + Vignon Marks

Fresco Vignon Marks


Fresco Marked Up

FrescoMarked


Durante

image


Durante Marked Up

ShroudFaceDuranteMarked


Durante Overlay with Fresco

DuranteFrescoOverlay-4020


Manoppello, Shroud and Durer: A Short Presentation by O.K.

September 2, 2014 15 comments

imageO.K. begins:

Background: Roberto Falcinelli’s in the paper The Veil of Manoppello: Work of Art or Authentic Relic?(from the 3rd International Dallas Conference on the Shroud of Turin in 2005) claims (by citing some ambiguous references about Dürer’s biography from the book of Giorgio Vasari, 16th century painter and architect ) that Manoppello Image may be Dürer’s self-portrait (or portrait of Raphael), instead of image of Christ.

In the thread Matching Faces. Is it possible? on Shroudstory, David Goulet commented:

OK, it would be a interesting experiment to use Dave Hines imaging overlay with the Manoppello image and the Albrecht Durer painting.

So let’s do it.

Now we must go to a PDF file. It is the best way to see it. CLICK HERE or on the picture shown here from the PDF file.

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