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Checking In on Mario Latendresse’s Sindonology Dot Org

May 13, 2015 2 comments

Home of the most helpful online Shroud Scope tools for everyone

imageMario, in a posting three days ago, tells us in words and pictures about Lirey:

The first ostentations of the Shroud of Turin in the Western world was in Lirey, a hamlet 16 km south of Troyes, the nearest large city. Lirey is still today a hamlet with a few houses and a 19th century chapel located on the same piece of land where the first chapel was built in 1353. The first ostentation of the Shroud would have been in 1356 or 1357. In 1418, the Shroud leaves the chapel and Lirey to be kept at the Montfort castle under the protection of Humbert de Villersexel. The Shroud never came back to Lirey although the clercs of Lirey tried to regain the Shroud many times over a century. A second chapel was inaugurated in 1525, which was demolished in 1828. A third chapel was built at the end of the 19th century. The following photographs show the inside and outside of this third chapel at Lirey.

There is more. Go look.

Picture for Today: Getting Ready for the Shroud Exhibition in 1931

May 10, 2015 5 comments
Categories: Exhibition, Other Blogs

Colin Berry’s Method and 3D Information

May 10, 2015 5 comments

it is presumptive to think the 3D information represents cloth-to-body distance.
It is presumptive because you must have a method in mind

clip_image001A reader writes:

Colin Berry’s method may provide synthetic cloth to body information represented by varying color density for close together body features such as fingers beside each other. It cannot provide proper relative spatial information for disparate features related to each other at a distance such as the tip of the nose and the outer edge of each cheek.  Dr. Berry’s method cannot generate the sort of spatial information we see in Petrus Soon’s 3D renditions.

You are possibly right that Colin’s method cannot produce meaningful, relative 3D information for “disparate features related to each other at a distance.”  That seems obvious when looking at his method. But is that 3D information really contained in the shroud image in the sense you suggest? Does it represent reality?

1) I’m still not convinced that the 3D information represents cloth-to-body distance. It works out, it seems to me, to somehow represent body shape but it is presumptive to think the 3D information represents cloth-to-body distance. It is presumptive because you must have a method in mind to even suggest it.

 2)  I certainly have serious reservations about the 3D work undertaken by Petrus Soons.  I suspect that the real 3D information on the shroud is more like what we see with ImageJ, the VP8 and John Jackson’s 3D corrugated cardboard plot exhibited at the U.S. Air Force Academy Chapel in Colorado.

Might Colin’s method produce that kind of 3D data? I don’t think so, “synthetic” or otherwise. But I don’t know that. I think we need to wait and see.

Categories: Other Blogs Tags: ,

Colin Berry Has It All Figured Out, Sort Of, Maybe

May 9, 2015 71 comments

You’ve got to love the experimentation and impressive results so far

imageColin Berry gives this lengthy title to a blog postings over at his Science Buzz blog: The chemical principles behind the iconic Turin Shroud can now be explained. All that remains is to produce a look-alike copy. Then he goes on to say:

It’s taken over 3 years of almost non-stop experimentation, but this blogger/retired science bod is now able to explain how the faint negative image of the Turin Shroud was obtained (as a feat of medieval technology, aided by alchemists).

The task: produce a contact image that could be claimed to be that left by the crucified Jesus on Joseph of Arimathea’s ‘fine linen’.

It’s incredibly simple in principle (why didn’t I think of it sooner?):

1. Paint an adult human male (alive or dead) with an organic paste …

2. Press linen against the subject (or subject against linen) …

3. Develop the image chemically….

[…]

So I maintain that the plausible science is established – at least in principle-  so far as producing a negative  sepia 2D image from imprinting off a 3D subjectis concerned.  Whether it matches all the additional or peculiar characteristics of the TS image (extreme superficiality, lack of reverse side image, lack of uv fluorescence, microscopic characteristics etc.) remains to be seen. However,let’s insert a note of caution: not all those listed characteristics were necessarily there immediately after image formation, regardless of age – centuries or millennia. Some of those characteristics may be a result of ageing. At present it seems sensible to adopt a broad-brush approach, attempting to accommodate  only those ‘headline’ characteristics of the TS that have led to its being described as iconic or enigmatic. Where the latter are concerned, the prize for the most ‘iconic’ must surely go to the pioneering 1898 photography by Secondo Pia, which converted the Shroud negative back into a positive (by innocently treating the TS as a positive and convereting to a negative!).

Categories: Image Theory, Other Blogs Tags:

James Randi Visits the Shroud of Turin

May 9, 2015 4 comments

imageFrom the Facebook page of James Randi, famed magician, arch-skeptic of all things supernatural and mentor to Joe Nickell, we have this picture and accompanying text:

I just returned from a great trip to Italy, and this time I was there when the fabulous "Shroud of Turin" was again being displayed to the eagerly gullible. Massimo took me to see it.

This huge rag — so thoroughly and authoritatively discredited by experts as even originating during the life of Christ — was guarded every 15 feet or so by garishly-costumed volunteers who glowered at me, perhaps because I so resembled a rabbi, but since the terrain was very bumpy I was given a wheelchair and was thereby had a very close-up view of the relic. In fact, I sat immediately beneath it, but found that I was far more fascinated by the hushed faithful who stood in reverent silence before it as the commentary droned on.

I must thank Roberta Baria for taking many photos and keeping me company. It was the first time I’d had a chance to see this fascinating object. and so very up close. I found the experience very interesting indeed…

Categories: Other Sites Tags:

A Folding Method Charles Freeman Might Accept

May 8, 2015 17 comments

Click on the image to see how it is done in steps 1 through 5

clip_image001[4]Stephen Jones, back in September of 2012, wrote:

A commenter on Dan Porter’s Shroud of Turin blog pointed out what I had previously realised, but had forgotten, that Dan’s "Tetradiplon" graphic illustrating how the Shroud of Turin, when "four-doubled" (Greek tetradiplon), with Jesus’ face uppermost, results in Jesus’ face only within a rectangle, in landscape aspect (exactly as in the oldest copies of the Image of Edessa), has a flaw in that it only shows three doublings of the Shroud (see above).

Even Ian Wilson’s illustrations of this in his books (e.g. "The Evidence of the Shroud," 1986, p.113; "Holy Faces, Secret Places," 1991, p.142; "The Blood and the Shroud," 1998, p.153; "The Turin Shroud," 2000, p.111; and "The Shroud," 2010, p.141), show the Shroud doubled only three times.

But some months ago I cut out a photo of the Shroud and proved to myself that the Shroud can be doubled four times in such a way that it results in Jesus’ face in a rectangular segment of the cloth, in landscape aspect,exactly as it is in early copies of the Image of Edessa. Here I will show how it can be done, in what is a reasonable way to fold a long cloth, minimising strain at its fold edges.

Stephen goes on to say:

This is consistent with major foldlines at one-eighth intervals, found on the Shroud by Dr John Jackson from raking light photographs of the Shroud taken in 1978 by the Shroud of Turin Research Project (STURP).

clip_image001

Very Nice Article About Russ Breault in Baton Rouge Paper

May 2, 2015 1 comment

image…by Terry Robinson in the Advocate, Baton Rouge edition. The title is Faith Matters: Fascination with Shroud of Turin lifelong:

“It really does peel back all the science and mystery and the controversy and addresses the question: Could this be the burial shroud of Jesus? Of course, that’s nothing that we can prove in a definitive fashion, but my position based on the evidence is I think it could be,” he said.

Breault, who lives in Atlanta, has presented the Shroud Encounter all over the United States and Canada.

“As someone once said, if this had been the shroud of Julius Caesar, no one would care. But since this is potentially the shroud of Jesus — probably the central figure of human history — that makes it profoundly significant,” said Breault, president and founder of the Shroud of Turin Education Project Inc., which works to raise awareness of the shroud.

Russ is …

bringing his passion and knowledge of the shroud to Baton Rouge. The Shroud Encounter presentation is set for 6 p.m. Saturday, May 9, at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church, 2250 Main St.

Categories: News & Views Tags:
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