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Charlie Rose interviews Thomas de Wesselow

April 18, 2012

imageClassic Charlie Rose!

An interview with Thomas de Wesselow on his new book about the Shroud of Turin.

It runs about 15 minutes.

  1. Ron
    April 18, 2012 at 5:08 pm

    You know, take away the bits of his hypothesis about the deciples mistaking the Shroud for a raised Christ and this interview is quite good in relation to the other aspects of the Shroud. The mention of the present Pope’s thoughts was very telling also. There is a slight chance this book may get some to peer further into the mystery of the Shroud….one can only hope ;-)

    R

  2. Kelly Kearse
    April 18, 2012 at 6:02 pm

    I agree, I think interviews like this could help raise awareness of the Shroud in a positive way. I liked that the balance of the interview was shifted towards de Wesselow’s personal belief that the Shroud is real & what convinced him of this, rather than trying to overly sell his views on the (absence of the) Resurrection.

    Regarding Charlie Rose’s comment about the current pope’s viewpoint being different than his predecessor, I believe that both BXVI & JP2 were convinced that the Shroud is authentic. BXVI has called the Shroud “An icon written in blood” and JP2 spoke that “The Shroud is an image of God’s love as well as of human sin. The imprint left by the tortured body of the Crucified One, which attests to the tremendous human capacity for causing pain and death to one’s fellow man, stands as an icon of the suffering of the innocent in every age” The position of the Catholic Church has always stopped short of declaring the Shroud authentic, but rather states that the Shroud is an object worthy of veneration, that is an object worthy of love & honor.

    I am about 2/3 of the way through de Wesselow’s book. No comment on the first portion, but the middle section dealing with the evidence for the Shroud being authentic is a pretty thorough, well-presented overview. A definite bias towards the Maillard reaction, and nothing but the Maillard reaction, but he writes in a very engaging style.

    Although I’m not finished with the book, it’s looking a bit like an oreo cookie-some readers may prefer to go straight to the icing in the middle and leave the first and last portions for later.

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